Xpatweb signs up early for next year's HR Indaba 

The early-bird discount was too good a deal to miss out on for expatriate services and immigration facilitation firm.

Expatriate services and immigration facilitation firm has re-signed for the HR Indaba Africa 2019, taking advantage of the early-bird discount, which exempts the company from paying the increased rate to showcase at next year’s event. The group, which has been in existence for 14 years, offers end-to-end expatriation solutions to some of the largest South African employers and international groups, with a comprehensive immigration service to obtain visas and permanent residence permits in an efficient and timely manner. Their team includes immigration specialists, master tax practitioners, master reward practitioners, attorneys, CAs and mobility practitioners.

“Xpatweb is focused on holistic expatriate services and immigration facilitation in particular because, when employers bring a foreign national into an organisation, their first port of call is getting their permits and immigration paperwork underway,” says Xpatweb Director & Head of Immigration and Mobility, Marisa Jacobs. “It is further vital for employers to ensure effectiveness during this process to allow expatriate assignees to focus on their relocation and to get settled in and productive as soon as possible."

There are scores of multinationals operating in South Africa, bringing expertise from their head office or other parts of the world. Expatriation also allows organisations to grow their talent by exposing them to international work experience, while local workforces can benefit from the expertise that expatriates bring with them. It therefore helps to have a company like Xpatweb that can ease the process of bringing in international talent. 

"Finding skills locally is tough already and when one adds to that the complexity of finding talent from around the world, including competing for skills,and navigating the immigration process, HR has its work cut out. South Africa has quite a big skills shortage, as do many countries on the African continent. Because of that, there are many instances of companies simply being unable to find certain skills in the local job market and thus having to expand their search to other territories,” says Marisa.