SA HR news roundup: Global multinationals eye local workforce

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Procurement professionals earn on average 10 percent more in the private sector.

Minister in the Presidency Mondli Gungubele says the country’s manufacturing sector could shed 100,000 jobs if it does not urgently move towards producing electric vehicles, while Shoprite truck drivers have protested against salary and benefits provided by the company, and have demanded a fixed basic salary and transport allowance.

Procurement professionals earn more in private sector

According to the Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply (CIPS) Procurement Salary Guide for 2022, procurement professionals are paid, on average, 10 percent more in the private sector than they would earn in the public sector.

Malcolm Harrison, CEO of CIPS, said procurement and supply professionals have become more in demand as the world came to note the importance of stable supply chains over the last two years.

Those in the public sector earn R605,000 a year on average, compared to R668,000 in the private sector, according to the guide.

The report also showed that more than half of procurement professionals received a pay rise in the last 12 months, with the majority of raises settling at 7.2 percent.

Vehicle manufacturing jobs at stake

Minister in the Presidency Mondli Gungubele says the country’s manufacturing sector needs to urgently move towards producing electric vehicles.

The European Union has given local vehicle exporters until 2030 to decarbonise the sector, after which they will stop importing internal combustion engine vehicles assembled in South Africa.

“If we don’t move in pace with that call, no fewer than 100,000 jobs are under threat. In other words, in that sector, we lose our status as a stakeholder and trading partner in the sector beyond that period,” Gungubele said.

Global multinationals eye local workforce

There is an increase in demand from global multinational clients looking to tap into the South African workforce. This is one of the findings of Michael Page’s annual Salary Guide and Hiring Insights 2023

Paul Newman, operating director for Michael Page South Africa, said, “South Africa appears to be high on the priority list due to time zones, language, available resources, and cost, which creates a challenge for local employers competing for the same talent.”

Other notable findings from the recruitment company were that 82 percent of respondents sought to work for a company that was committed in Environmental, Social and Corporate Governance (ESG); 78 percent of employees wanted to continue to work remotely for at least two days a week; and 77 percent browse online reviews of a company when responding to a job advert.

Shoprite truck drivers protest against payment structure

About 80 Shoprite truck drivers have protested against salary and benefits provided by the company, and have demanded a fixed basic salary and transport allowance.

Shosholoza Workers Union of South Africa (Showusa) shop steward Siyabulela Njuku told GroundUp that drivers are paid per hour and have to work 195 hours per month to get a basic salary. He said drivers are forced to work overtime to compensate for hours lost while they were on leave or sick.

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